This week has seen a variety of feminist news and news related to women – Parsi women moved the court, a woman was gang-raped by the sarpanch, Goa CM advising nurses not to protest under the sun and some positive news in the form of a Muslim girl winning a Gita competition and a slow rise in women-oriented political parties. Check out what you missed in the news wrap.

Two women have moved the Supreme Court demanding that Parsi women married outside the religion should be allowed to enter the Fire Temple and perform last rites.

A woman was gang raped by the village sarpanch and others for refusing to donate towards a Hindu ritual.

Another horrific instance of RWA led mob violence in Delhi – this time with a woman who was sterilising dogs with Court permission. She was subjected to prolonged violence including sexual violence.

Purvi Patel, an Indian American woman in Indiana, is convicted for 20 years of fetal homicide and child neglect which makes no sense. The verdict makes Patel the first woman in the U.S. to be charged, convicted and sentenced for “foeticide” for ending her own pregnancy.

Vogue India’s third video starring Deepika Padukone in its series of ‘Vogue Empower’ met with heavy criticism. Its first two videos were also on the same lines, using the movement for its own benefits.

The Chief Minister of Goa told nurses not to sit in the sun as it will make them dark and ruin their marital prospects, while they were on a hunger strike and protesting a fraud committed by a company in connivance with the government.

There has been a slow rise in women-oriented political parties. Since 2001, at least 14 political parties with a women-oriented political agenda have emerged across India, according to an analysis of an official list of political parties from April 2001 to January 2015.

A 12 Year Old Muslim Girl From Mumbai Wins A Gita Competition Breaking All Stereotypes

The NDA govt is on the verge of passing executive orders that would do away with the veto powers of tribals that protect their forestlands in most cases.

From Jamia to Jadavpur, sanitary pads emerge as a symbol of protest against sexism. While the universities call the protests “unacceptable” and may punish the students, the girls leading the campaign ask: “What’s ‘unacceptable’ – menstruation, the sanitary pad, or women?”

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